science

Watch a 360-degree view of Jupiter during an Io eclipse

Yesterday, we posted some amazing photos from Juno Probe’s 29The tenth Fly from Jupiter. Juno is in a very elliptical orbit. It flies over the planet at an altitude of 4,200 km and then swept over the planet to 8.1 million. By completing this circuit every 53 days, Juno spends just two hours in close proximity to Jupiter, minimizing the probe’s exposure to the harmful radiation of high-energy particles that are accelerated by Jupiter’s magnetic field.

Io Eclipse on Jupiter from Juno Peregoff 22 – NASA / Jet Propulsion Laboratory / Kevin Gill

In every orbit, Juno captures stunning images of Jupiter’s clouds with JunoCam. On one of the previous flights, Perijove 22 (Jupiter approached 22) on September 12, 2019, JunoCam also captured an eclipse! Jupiter’s moon, Io, remains clearly visible on the cloud tops of the giant world (pictured above). The picture has recently gained a new traction in the media, but there is something more exciting. Earlier this week, Kevin Gill A software engineer who was processing raw images from Juno for the audience, converted data from the Io Eclipse into an interactive 360-degree video. With visuals up to 8K resolution, you can actually fly over Jupiter’s clouds at the point where Io’s shadow falls and then drag the image to see Jupiter around you! Go visit Jupiter!

Kevin also handles photos from other NASA missions and the photos are amazing. You can follow Kevin’s work on Twitter (kevinmgill) And Instagram (Embed a Tweet). The Kevin Collection is available at Flickr account Which includes the latest Perjove 29 photos we’ve published yesterday.

More to explore:

Does Jupiter have a solid core? – The universe today

READ  SpaceX was producing boosted parts for the Starship Super Heavy before the first stack

What’s Inside Jupiter – Universe Today Video

What the Juno mission taught us about Jupiter – astronomy

NASA Juno Mission Site

NASA Juno detects changes in Jupiter’s magnetic field

The composition of Jupiter’s heart diluted by a giant impact – nature

How Jupiter divided the asteroid belt in two shows its great age

Phil Schwartz

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