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English Bulldogs are more likely to be diagnosed with illnesses and diseases

If English bulldog breeding continues with these physical characteristics, their breeding can also be banned United kingdom. These are the conclusions A new study published June 15 in Canine Medicine and Genetics Which provides more details about the possible diseases and ailments that can be infected with this animal.

Fans of this breed know the fact that the English bulldog suffers from many health problems. He was originally bred as a muscular and athletic dog for bull fightingOver the years, it has been bred to be a companion animal with a short (brachycephaly) skull, prominent jaw, skin folds, and stocky build. These physical characteristics are linked to many health issues and countries such as the Netherlands and Norway have restricted the breeding of English bulldogs in recent years.

The new study conducted by Royal College of Veterinary Medicine, in England, identifies and better illustrates the serious clinical diseases and conditions this breed can develop compared to other dogs. Researchers compared veterinary medical records from across the UK from 2016 and found that, on average, English bulldogs have Twice as likely to be diagnosed with at least one disorder.

What diseases do English bulldogs develop?

More specifically, English Bulldogs are likely to evolve more often Dermatitis It is called an eye condition Third eyelid ptosis or Cherry eye. The condition involves a dog’s third eyelid that protrudes with a red, swollen mass at the bottom of the eye. Also, dogs of this breed are more susceptible to infection Lower jaw diagnosisa special case in which the lower jaw is too long in relation to the upper jaw.

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Among the most dangerous dangers there is certainly chronic obstructive pulmonary syndrome, a respiratory disease characterized by irreversible obstruction of the airway that can lead to severe respiratory problems. The authors also reported that a significant portion of the Bulldogs examined were under the age of eight, confirming that these animals have a shorter average lifespan than other dogs.

According to the authors, these health problems are set to increase. What man has done for many years with most dogs is called “artificial selection“: Breeders force the mating of animals by choosing in advance the physical characteristics that they want to appear in future generations. In the case of dogs with a muscular head, the shape of the muzzle is flat, the jaw is prominent, the eyes are round and expressive, etc. It is preferable to find mating dogs with these characteristics in puppies . Unfortunately, this process is often dictated by fashion And from the fact that these dogs seem more sympathetic to us, ignoring the many health problems that this practice causes.

Kodami’s position and expert opinion

Brachycephalic dog breeds are a major concern for the Kodami. We often set ourselves against artificial selection that favors such extreme physical characteristics in dogs. To satisfy our tastes and fashions of the moment, we force these animals to endure excruciating living conditions. Last April 1, we also sent an important message. A joke, of course, but with the serious intent of denouncing the situation in which our animal companions find themselves.

This is what happens, and continues to happen today, in many English bulldog and other brachycephalic breeds. What the study authors suggest isn’t a farm break but one Redefining Standards. If future generations of English bulldogs were bred with less remarkable physical characteristics, there would be a marked improvement in the quality of life of these dogs and would likely prevent the breeding of that animal in others as well.

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Earl Warner

"Devoted bacon guru. Award-winning explorer. Internet junkie. Web lover."

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