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A care facility fined $ 20,500 for handling resident care during the coronavirus pandemic

A care facility in southwestern Iowa was fined $ 20,500 for its handling of resident care during the coronavirus pandemic. KETV NewsWatch 7 investigators obtained the 60-page report compiled by the Iowa Department of Inspection and Appeals (DIA) and the 91-page report submitted by the Iowa Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) . Details of the facility’s failure to implement an infection control program, saying Oakland Manor has not quarantined residents for at least ten days after symptoms of COVID-19 first appeared. Inspectors spent more than a month at the facility interviewing employees, administrators, and residents. But what they found was that there was a real shortage of any kind of infection control programs put in place by their staff, said Matt Wiyant, director of planning for Butawatami County. “The inspectors also found that employees did not properly sterilize some equipment and wore incomplete or inappropriate personal clothing. Protective equipment, among other violations related to COVID-19, inspectors also reported: Staff routinely wore masks and goggles, but did not wear them. The gowns are consistently, incidents described employees failing to change gloves when moving from one patient to the next, and Wiyant said his employees who run the county public health department have tried to persuade Oakland Manor to follow the state’s guidelines since early April. And get some interference there. ”State investigators also reported that the facility’s precautionary area was never properly closed, but the Assistant Director of Nursing at Oakland Manor indicated,“ They kept residents’ doors closed. ”According to Potawatami County Public Health, 10 died. A resident of Oakland Manor due to COVID-19.During the facility’s outbreak, 30 residents tested positive for the virus, along with 17 employees. “It’s hard to read to know that people are most likely to be treated the way they are,” said Ynet. The Iowa DIA / CMS reports on Oakland Manor have overridden COVID-19 concerns. According to investigators: The facility was unable to demonstrate that five residents received showers regularly. One of the residents identified as Patient 6 reportedly had no shower documents for the weeks of June 29 – July 13 and July 27 – August 3. Ulcers allegedly not properly documented. One of the residents identified as Patient 7 had dementia and acute renal failure. In May, he was found outside the facility on his hands and knees, covered with stool, with his back side exposed. CIA investigators said that staff were reportedly told not to speak about the incident because the nursing director “did not want the official to know that he was out.” Investigators said staff were allowed to use phones instead of the facilities. Walkie-talkies, although there is a policy banning the use of phones while on duty, inspectors said Oakland Manor failed to provide jugs of water or glasses in some residents’ rooms. In one section, investigators determined that Oakland Manor “should develop and implement a comprehensive, person-centered care plan for every resident.” Glenn Hurst is listed as a medical director at Oakland Manor, but has only spoken to KETV Newswatch 7 Investigates as a top health advocate and family practice physician, and Hearst said in March that he had filed his case with Pottawattamie County and the state health department to build a long-term nursing and care facility New capable of meeting CDC standards and public health guidelines related to COVID-19. Hearst said nursing homes, especially in rural areas, cannot meet standards set by the local and state government across Iowa. “Nursing facilities are not equipped to manage (COVID-19). You cannot expect a township facility of 1,500 people to get staff to provide the level of care that the CDC guidelines suggest.” When asked why he was not suspended as a medical director, Hearst said he could not speak to Day-to-day care for patients because it does not operate at the site, Wyant said Oakland Manor should correct the violations or risk losing its license and closing it. “What we really hope to see from this, is to see the company office really come forward and act on some repairs; implement this infectious control immediately.” Don Macpherson said her aunt Nancy Palmer Nightser, 72, moved to Oakland Manor four years ago after a knee replacement. She was always happy. It was kinda lit. “She knew everything about everyone, and when she got up there it was a clean and nice place. That all changed with COVID-19. It was just a terrible place. She felt bad for anyone there.” Macpherson said she had to. She called the facility to find out that her aunt had tested positive for the virus after hearing about the outbreak in June. “She recovered, but then they started talking about an infection in her knee,” she said, adding that the facility called her late last month to inform her that her aunt was dying. Macpherson said she went up to see it before her death, and said that no one was wearing full PPE. ”Macpherson said that everyone in their lives was in danger of a heartbreaking thing, and they didn’t care enough to put it on, and they didn’t care enough to wear it when I was there. KETV Newswatch investigation 7. Everyone in the facility was not given the chance to die with dignity as they deserve. “In my view, they were not fined enough,” MacPherson said.

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A care facility in southwestern Iowa was fined $ 20,500 for its handling of resident care during the coronavirus pandemic.

KETV NewsWatch 7 investigators obtained the 60-page report compiled by the Iowa Department of Inspection and Appeals (DIA) and the 91-page report submitted by the Iowa Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicaid and Medicaid Services (CMS) .

It details the facility’s failure to implement the infection control program, saying that Oakland Manor did not quarantine residents for at least ten days after symptoms of COVID-19 first appeared.

Inspectors spent more than a month at the facility interviewing employees, administrators, and residents.

“What they found was that there was a real lack of any kind of infection control program that their staff put in place,” said Matt Wayant, director of planning for Butawatami County.

Inspectors also found that staff did not properly disinfect some equipment and wore incomplete or inadequate personal protective equipment, among other violations.

Among other violations related to COVID-19, inspectors also reported:

  • Staff routinely wore masks and goggles, but did not wear gowns consistently.
  • Accidents describe employees’ failure to change gloves when moving from patient to patient.

Wayant said his employees who run the county public health department have tried to persuade Oakland Manor to follow the state’s guidelines since early April.

“I knew we had to call her to the country and have some interference there,” Wayant said.

State investigators also reported that the facility’s protective isolation area was not properly closed, but the Assistant Director of Nursing at Oakland Manor indicated that “they kept the residents’ doors closed.”

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According to Pottawattamie County Public Health, 10 Oakland Manor residents have died of COVID-19. During the facility outbreak, 30 residents tested positive for the virus, along with 17 employees.

“It’s hard to read to know that people are the most vulnerable of their time and are treated the way they are,” Wayant said.

But the Iowa DIA / CMS reports about Oakland Manor override COVID-19 concerns. According to investigators:

  • The facility was unable to demonstrate that five residents received baths regularly.
  • One resident identified as ill reportedly did not have 6 bathroom documents for the weeks of June 29 – July 13 and July 27 – August 3.
  • Another resident required emergency surgery for skin sores that were not properly documented.
  • One of the residents identified as Patient 7 had dementia and acute renal failure. In May, he was found outside the facility on his hands and knees, covered with stool, with his back side exposed. CIA investigators said that staff were said to have been informed not to speak about the incident because the nursing director “did not want the official to know that he was out.”
  • Investigators said that employees were allowed to use phones in place of the facilities. Wireless communication devices, although there is a policy prohibiting the use of phones during service
  • Inspectors said Oakland Manor had failed to provide jugs or glasses of water in some residents’ rooms.

In one section, investigators determined that Oakland Manor “should develop and implement a comprehensive, person-centered care plan for every resident.”

Dr Glenn Hirst is listed as Oakland Manor’s medical director, but he spoke to KETV Newswatch 7 Investigates only as a top health advocate and family practice physician.

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In March, Hearst said he had submitted his case to Potawatami County and the state health department to build new long-term care, nursing facility capable of meeting CDC standards and public health guidelines related to COVID-19. Hearst said nursing homes, especially in rural areas, cannot meet standards set by the local and state government across Iowa.

“Nursing facilities are not equipped to manage (COVID-19). You cannot expect a facility in a city of 1,500 people to have staff to provide the level of care that the CDC’s guidelines suggest,” he said.

When asked why he was not suspended as a medical director, Hearst said he cannot speak to day care of patients because he does not work on site.

Wayant said Oakland Manor should correct the violations or risk losing its license and being closed.

“What we really hope to see from this is to see the company office actually move forward and move towards some repairs; implement these infectious control practices promptly, and assist facility personnel immediately in the way they should be helped,” he said.

Dawn Macpherson said her aunt Nancy Palmer Nightser, 72, moved to Oakland Manor four years ago after a knee replacement.

“She was always happy,” said Macpherson. “She was the kind of social little butterfly out there, knowing everything about everyone.”

“When I first got there the place was clean and nice. That all changed with COVID-19.

It was just a horrible place. I felt bad for anyone there. “

Macpherson said she had to contact the facility to find out that her aunt had tested positive for the virus after hearing about the outbreak in June.

“She recovered, but then they started talking about an infection in her knee,” Macpherson said.

She said the facility called her late last month to let her know her aunt was dying. Macpherson said she went up to see her before she died, and said no one was wearing full PPE.

“Knowing that everyone in their lives is in danger is heartbreaking, and they didn’t care enough to wear it, and didn’t care enough to wear it when I was there,” Macpherson said.

Macpherson learned of the facility’s fines through a KETV Newswatch 7 investigation.

She said that not everyone in the facility was given the chance to die with dignity as they deserved.

“In my view, they were not fined enough,” Macpherson said.

Phil Schwartz

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